Monday, March 27, 2006

Scout Canyoneering Trip on which Nothing Bad Happened

We too the Varsity Scouts through Ding and Dang canyons near Little Wild Horse canyon last weekend. We set up a rappel in Dang canyon and encountered three water pockets in Dang canyon that we weren't expecting. Although we got home three or so hours later than planned, no scouts were injured, mained or hurt on the entire trip.

We did Ding and Dang counter clockwise. The rappel is optional, the ledge system around the dry fall is quite safe. The water obstacles were tricky but Varsity Scouts with competent adult leadership can get through it with some coaching. Be careful with shorter scouts because they may not be able to wedge into and across the water puddles through the narrows. This is a more adventurous and less crowded alternative to Little Wild Horse and Bell canyons. Though Little Wild Horse is still more beautiful.

9 comments:

Dawnawanna said...

Did you guys use static ropes, or did you use dynamic climbing ropes? How long was the rappel? I've been thinking it would be fun to do some canyoneering. I know I could make it work with my climbing rope, but I'm wondering if it's lots and lots easier/better with a static line... What extra gear (besides standard rap stuff did you carry)?

I've been thinking about what I would carry, but I wondered what an experienced canyoneer would take.

Dawnawanna said...

When are you guys doing the White Rim Trail? Kent and I are thinking about heading up to N. Idaho to do a Rails-to-Trails ride and wanted to plan it after your White Rim trip (so I'll have my bike back).

Mike Jones said...

White rim is the weekend before my birthday circa June 18. Thanks for letting us use the bike.

For Ding and Dang you can either tie off on the bolt above the falls if you are comfortable with pre drilled bolts or you can tie off on a boulder, which is what we did (someone else was using the bolt). We doubled everything so we used 2 sections of webbing about 6 feet long each to ancher to a boulder 2 quick draws and a locking carabiner to attach to the boulder. I don't know for sure, but I am pretty sure the rope was static.

Ding and Dang are a good introduction to non-walking canyoneering because there's a good escape route through most of it and the rappel is optional (but more fun).

Dawnawanna said...

"The" Bolt? Nice to see that canyoneering uses redundant anchors. I would have used the boulder too. One bolt in sandstone doesn't sound like a great anchor.

Dawnawanna said...

PS - I am very comfortable with bolts. That's what I climb on all the time. Just not one bolt placed in sandstone.

Navneet Sharma said...

Hi,

"Ding and Dang"

Any interesting story behind the name?

Just curious.

Navs

Mike Jones said...

It was named by Steve Allen who wrote the seminal book on Canyoneering the San Rafael Swell (published in 2000, this is still a remote part of the World). From his route description, I think he named it after the beach boys' song "Ding Dang"

I don't think that's a very interesting story, but maybe Steve Allen had a better reason?

Good to hear from you Navneet. Hope school is going well.

Navneet Sharma said...

Hi,

"May be Steve Allen had a better reason", once again, got me in the "I wonder what they were thinking" mode. :)

School is going great. Keeping me busy. I love it. Prelims coming up so tied up atleast for another month or two. No complaints though.

Problem solving is a hobby (one of my favorites) and my research gives me plenty of opportunities to do that.

Missing out on travelling though.

Thanks,
Navs

Mike Jones said...

I was reading along in Adams' book the other day and he says, in a different place, that "ding dang dome" is named after numerous failed attempts to reach its' summit. If you ever see it, its basically a pillar of loose crumbley rock.